Archive for the education Category

Productive insomnia, there’s something wrong with that phrase.

Posted in education, writing with tags , , , , on October 28, 2011 by generatedanomaly

The interview I had Tuesday night went so well they scheduled me for a second interview yesterday that was then rescheduled for today, in four hours. And, here I am, too tired to be nervous because my brain decided it wanted to work through the problems on a side project I haven’t thought about in months.

Good news is, I figured out all those problems. The bad news, well, I’m going to need to fake some energy when I get in to the interview.

I might have mentioned the project before. It’s an educational card game on par with Munkin or Flux, but different enough to need its own sort of game engine. That engine kept my brain preoccupied for hours last night, but I have it. The next step is more research and designing the cards. Then, play testing. I might actually get to that part before the end of the school year, and I might be able to get into a classroom to do it. Once it’s done, then I’ll figure out the marketing/production aspects.

I’m hoping the combination of side effect cards and ability to sabotage┬áthe other players will keep students engaged with the process and help them remember some key concepts and some scientists. Either way, it will be something to keep me busy for a bit now that I seem to have gotten it all figured out.

The other good news, I reached the spot for the fight scene I’ve had in my head for months. Getting that out of my system and the bit that follows will be nice, then it’s all downhill to the end. Or so I tell myself. I’m sure it won’t be as easy as that. It rarely is, but at least the novels don’t have the months of downtime while I figure them out.

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I do need the part of my brain where the words live.

Posted in education, job search, writing on August 23, 2011 by generatedanomaly

I’m waiting for the day when I can say I’ve been busy because I’ve been our promoting my book, not because I’ve been working on a day job. Since I haven’t published yet, I am glad for the hours at work. I just wish they didn’t leave me feeling like I lost part of my brain. The important part. The one with all the words in it. I need that part.

I’m sure there are people who would argue against that. The world doesn’t need another writer not contributing to society they’ll say. (These people are assholes. They’re the same ones that said the President had issues with reality because he reads fiction.) Go, get a real job, do things for society.

My response is a good one. After I get done staring through narrowed eyes and resist the urge to break faces it breaks down into a long-winded diatribe. I have my Masters’ degree in education. My intent was to do something good for society, but society decided that we didn’t need to educate our children in any profound way. They passed a test! Fantastic, they’re ready for college. Except, they aren’t. Those kids coming into college this year aren’t ready. Some of them might be, but those are the kids that decided to take their education into their own hands. They’re the ones that got bored and sought out information on their own.

I should be getting ready to stand in front of a bunch of teenagers and teach them chemistry in a couple of weeks. Instead, I have no idea what I’m doing for income after next Monday. I should be trying out new labs and finding decorations for my classroom. Instead, I’m staring at my notes for short stories, crossing my fingers that something sells.

Now, I don’t want anyone to get the idea that I wouldn’t be writing. I would be. I’m a writer. It’s what I do and writers serve a function in society. They’ve replaced the storytellers of old, providing wisdom and entertainment for the masses. I would just be writing while having a steady job. I would be writing much less the first couple years while I build up my reservoir of lesson plans and materials.

I guess my point was, this country is messed up. It’s going in a direction it doesn’t want to go in, but everyone’s too afraid to say it. The outcomes are going to be bad. They’re going to be dark, and the young kids we’re turning to out of college to lead the way, they’re going to be lost because we put so many things above their education.